Wednesday, November 19, 2008

A Mother's collection of Proverbs.


Following is a list of Proverbs collected by a Seventeenth Century mother. She included them in a book that she wrote for her son, to help him in his way on life's journey. Oh that we would have more mums like this godly woman!

From: Miscellanea: a Mixture of divers and sundry things, as, Prayers, Meditations, Memoratives. by Elizabeth Grymeston. 1604, 1608, 1618.

* The darts of lust are the eyes; and therefore fix not thy eye on that which thou mayest not [should not] desire.

* Opportunity kindleth the fire of concupiscence [lust for that which is not lawfully appropriate].

* In all temptations it is safer to flee, than to fight with Satan.

* Shun occasion of doing evil, and thou hast half overcome him.

* Affections are the feet of the mind; and therefore set a watch over them, lest they make her miscarry.

* Examine thy thoughts. If thou findest them to be good, there is the Spirit: quench not the Spirit. If bad, forbid them entrance: for once admitted, they straightways fortify, and are expelled with more difficulty, than not admitted.

* Epicurism is the fuel of lust; the more thou addest, the more she is inflamed.

* there is no moment of time spent, which thou art not accountable for, and therefore, when thou hearest the clock strike, think there is now another hour come whereof thou art to yield to reckoning; and by endeavouring to spend one hour better than another, thou shalt come to some better perfection in Christianity.

* He that considereth the joys of heaven that good me expect, or the dread of torments which the bad shall suffer, will hardly sin.

* The end of a dissolute life is a desperate death. There was never president to the contrary, but in the thief in the Gospel: in one, lest any should despair; in one alone, lest any should presume.

* Think from whence thou camest, and blush; where thou art, and sigh: and tremble to remember whither thou shalt go.

* Desperate thoughts are for such as fear shame, and not for such as hope for credit.

* Evil thoughts are the Devils harbingers: for he lodgeth not, but where they provide his entertainment.

* The whole world is as an house of exchange, in which Fortune is the nurse that breeds alteration.

* Mishap is the touchstone of friendship, and adventure is the trial of friends.

* Indifferent equality is safest superiority.

* Where proportion keeps not the door, there confusion will quickly enter.

* Where passions encreate, complaints multiply.

* It is neither freedom to live licentiously, not liberty to live without labour.

* Labour in youth, gives strong hope of rest in old age.

* Carefulness and diligence are the keys of certainty.

* A malefactor hath Fear for his bedfellow, Care for his companion, and the sting of conscience for his torment.

* In contention, advised patience and opportunity well taken, are the best weapons of advantage.

* Thanks wax old when gifts are had in possession.

* So give, as that thou mayst always be giving, and never be said to have done giving.

* Give to the poor, but not beyond thy power.

* If thou givest a benefit keep it close; but if thou receivest one, publish it: for that invites another.

* Let thy wit be thy friend, thy mind thy companion, thy tongue thy servant.

* Let virtue be thy life, valour thy love, honour thy fame, and heaven thy felicity.

* In differences rather choose to purchase by persuasion, than to enjoy by violence.

* He that leaves his wife a Gold finch, mayhap at his return find her a Wagtale.

* On the anvil of upbraiding is forged the office of unthankfulness.

* True nobility descending from ancestry, proves base, if present life continue not thy dignity.

* The longer we delay to show our virtue, the stronger is the presumption that we are guilty of base beginning.

* Who may do all that he will [whatever he wants], will do that which he should not.

* Let thy speech be the shadow of thy deed.

* He is not worthy to find the truth, that deceitfully seeks her.

* Innocency groweth in despite of oppression.

* Dominion is always attended by envy.

* Fortune is always a friend to froward mind.

* He never gives in vain that gives in zeal.

* Courtesy is the true character of a good mind.

* Anger is the cradle of courage.

* Looking eyes have liking hearts.

* Truth is the centre of religion.

* Dominion is safest, where obedience is best nourished.

* Let the eyes be sentinels of the body.

* By being silent, thou shalt both know other men's imperfections and conceal thine own.

* Charity and humility purchase immortality.

* Age may gaze at beauty's blossoms, but youth climbs the tree and enjoys the fruit.

* Death is the tribute all flesh must pay.

* He dies most willingly that lived most honestly.

* Who lives to die, dies to live.

* Time is the herald of Truth: and Truth the daughter of time.

* Who climbs by privy sin shall fall with open shame.

* Who swims in vice, will sink in vanity.

* The young man may die quickly, but the old man cannot live long.

* The chief properties of wisdom are, to be mindful of things past, careful of things present, provident of things to come.

* The longer God stayeth, not finding ammendment, the sorer he scourgeth when he comes to judgement.

* Whoso passeth many years, and purchaseth little profit, hath had a long being, and a short life.

* Let thy apparel be cleanly without singularity: thy speech such as may maintain love and win affection.

* Use such affability and convenient complements, as common civility and usual courtesy most requireth, without making thy self too cheap to they friend, or him too dear to thee.

* Be not at any time idle. Alexander's soldiers should scale mole-hills rather than rest unoccupied: it is the woman that sitteth still, that imagineth mischief: it is the rolling stone that riseth clean, and the running water that remaineth clear.

* Standing water is soonest frozen, and he that sitteth still, is quickliest overcome with sleep.

* Thoughts are the buds of the mind, and words the blossoms of their desires; and deeds the fruits of their event: and therefore he that will not suffer ill thoughts to fructify, must crop them in the bud.

* There be four good mothers have four bad daughters: Truth hath Hatred; Prosperity hath Pride; Security hath Peril; and Familiarity hath Contempt.

* He that refuseth to take good counsel cheap, buys repentance too dear.

* Let thy love hang on thy hearts bottom, not on they tongues brim.

* Mistrust no man without cause, neither be credulous without proof.

* Suspicion may enter a false action, but it is proof brings in the good plea.

* When we are most miserable, then God's grace is most favourable.

* Who thinks before he do, thrives before he think.

* A perverse man is like a sea crab that always swimmeth against the stream.

* Wisdom is that Olive that springeth from the heart, bloometh on the tongue, and beareth fruit in the actions.

* The end of treacheries is to have no trust.

* He that makes a question where there is no doubt, must take an answer where there is no reason.

* Where marriage rides on the saddle, repentance will be on the crupper.

* Before thou sleep, apparel thy remembrance with thou didst waking.

* It is less pain to learn in youth, than to be ignorant in old age.

* Better not to be, than to be slave to passion.

* Humility raiseth when fortune depresseth.

* He receives a benefit that bestows it worthily.

* Courtesy in majesty binds affection in duty.

* Delay in punishment is no privilege of pardon.

* The law of fear is melted by Christ in the mold of love.

* Every man is the workman of his fortune, and fashioneth her according to his manners.

* Happy is the mishap whereby we pass to better perfection.

* Poverty that contenteth is best riches.

* Death and misfortune come soon enough if slow enough.

* So love as thou mayest hate.

* So hate as thou mayest love. And both without challenge.

* Opinion judgeth that the best, which it least enjoyeth.

* Judges opinions make suits immortal.

* A good belief bringeth forth a good life.

* No greater comfort than to know much: no less labour than to say little.

* Prosperity breedeth ignorance, and adversity bringeth forth knowledge.

* He cannot judge of pleasure, that never tasted pain.

* He finds best help in adversity, that seeks it in prosperity.

* The man is happiest that liveth least his own, and most his neighbour's.

* A little stream drives a light mill.

* A small sum pays a short reckoning.

* Give a lazy Clerk a lean fee.

* In little meddling lieth much rest.

* Where opportunity opens the shop door, the ware is best sold.

* A wanton eye lighteth where it leveleth.

* Jealousy is the harbinger of disdain.

* He that will stir affection in others, must show passion in himself.

* Lingering is loathsome where necessity requireth haste.

* Careless men are ever nearest their own harm.

* After the unlawful getting of a covetous father, soon followeth the riotous spending of a prodigal son.

* The virtue of a Prince is the chiefest authority of his magistrate.

* A mild answer reconciles displeasure.

* A wanton eye is the messenger of an unchaste heart.

* There is nothing swifter decreasing, than youth while it is increasing.

* The soul is the greatest thing in the least continent.

* Let the limits of they power, be the bounds of thy will.

* A fair woman is a paradise to the eye, a purgatory to the purse, and a hell to the soul.

* The death of an evil man is the safety of a good man.

* What harm the heart doth think, and hand effect, that will the worm of conscience betray.

1 comment:

Steve from the Alice said...

All good stuff! I particularly liked, "Anger is the cradle of courage!" Not so sure about the one granting permission to old geezers about looking at beauty's fruit while young fellas climb the tree to pick it!